History

 

Our World Neighborhood Charter School opened its doors on September 30, 2002 and turned a new page in the history of public education in New York City. The school is an outgrowth of the Astoria Parents Network, a group of parents concerned about overcrowding in the public schools and discouraged by lack of opportunities for meaningful parent involvement in the local schools.

The school is located across the street from the Museum of the Moving Image, providing education with the foundation of rigorous liberal arts education within a remarkable environment of cultural diversity. Computers are a functioning part of every classroom and technology is an integral part of the program. Students are prepared to meet the challenges of high school as well as to be well-rounded thinkers and doers.

The founders of our school were interested in child-centered models of instruction based on cooperative, active learning and parent involvement, and the school adopted a comprehensive social-studies model integrating the study of history, geography, literature, social sciences, science, math, art, music, technology and Spanish. At OWN Charter School the parent, teacher, and student relationship is key to the academic success of all students. To that end, parents are involved in the operation and growth of the school's programs. Teachers work to create learning environments that are rich in the exploration of core subjects such as reading, writing and mathematics. Students are also engaged in the study of science, geography, social studies, Spanish, music, art, physical education and filmmaking.

Our World Neighborhood Charter School was featured in New York City's Best Public Middle Schools and the New York City's Best Public Elementary Schools as of December 2003.

OWN Charter School is located in one of the most ethnically diverse neighborhoods in the United States. We celebrate this by integrating the cultural richness of our community with the lessons of the classroom and the governance of the school. All members of the OWN community - students, teachers, and administration - are expected to reflect on the nature and quality of their work and interactions, and to strive to reach their full potential as learners and as citizens.